Laboratory of Innate Immunity and Cell Death Publication

PUBLICATION

A comparative study of apoptosis, pyroptosis, necroptosis, and PANoptosis components in mouse and human cells
Author
Sk Mohiuddin Choudhury, Roman Sarkar, Rajendra Karki, Thirumala-Devi Kanneganti
Journal
Public Library of Science one
Status
2024 Feb
Vol
19(2)
Page
e0299577
Year
2024
File
79_2024_A comparative study of apoptosis, pyroptosis, necroptosis, and PANoptosis components in mouse and human cells.pdf (2.1M) 1회 다운로드 DATE : 2024-07-10 15:28:35

Abstract

Regulated cell death is a key component of the innate immune response, which provides the first line of defense against infection and homeostatic perturbations. However, cell death can also drive pathogenesis. The most well-defined cell death pathways can be categorized as nonlytic (apoptosis) and lytic (pyroptosis, necroptosis, and PANoptosis). While specific triggers are known to induce each of these cell death pathways, it is unclear whether all cell types express the cell death proteins required to activate these pathways. Here, we assessed the protein expression and compared the responses of immune and non-immune cells of human and mouse origin to canonical pyroptotic (LPS plus ATP), apoptotic (staurosporine), necroptotic (TNF-α plus z-VAD), and PANoptotic (influenza A virus infection) stimuli. When compared to fibroblasts, both mouse and human innate immune cells, macrophages, expressed higher levels of cell death proteins and activated cell death effectors more robustly, including caspase-1, gasdermins, caspase-8, and RIPKs, in response to specific stimuli. Our findings highlight the importance of considering the cell type when examining the mechanisms regulating inflammation and cell death. Improved understanding of the cell types that contain the machinery to execute different forms of cell death and their link to innate immune responses is critical to identify new strategies to target these pathways in specific cellular populations for the treatment of infectious diseases, inflammatory disorders, and cancer.